Food & Recipes Uncategorized

A Zesty Herbed Salad For People Who Hate Lettuce

Sep 01, 2015 Marie Davis

Sometimes, it feels as if there are only so many ways to brighten up a boring salad. An unusual ingredient here, a crazy concoction of dressing there — it’s different, but it’s not really different enough to be exciting. Enter this super-fresh crowd-pleaser. Made with fresh herbs, crumbled feta, a touch of lemon and colorful cabbage, this lettuce-free salad is a zesty, flavorful alternative you’ll be thrilled to serve and eat.

Fresh Cabbage, Mint and Feta Salad

Recipe created by Deborah Madison

Marcus Nilsson/O, The Oprah Magazine Share on Pinterest

Ingredients

4 c. (1 pound) red cabbage, thinly sliced

1 medium red onion, thinly sliced

1/2 c. (1 1/2 oz.) crumbled Feta cheese

1 lemon

2 Tbsp. olive oil

1 clove garlic, minced

2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

2 Tbsp. chopped fresh dill

2 Tbsp. chopped fresh mint

1 tsp. sea salt, plus more to taste

Ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the red onion and cook, stirring often, until softened (about 4 minutes). Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute more.

Add the red cabbage and 1 tsp. salt to the skillet, and cook until the cabbage has wilted and just starting to soften (about 2 minutes). Remove the skillet from the heat.

Add freshly squeezed lemon juice to the cabbage-onion mixture, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add the chopped parsley, dill and mint, and stir to combine. Transfer to a serving bowl.

Top with crumbled feta, and serve warm or at room temperature.

Pairs well with: Sparkling lemonade elixir

Also on HuffPost:

  • A Fruity, Juicy Quencher With A Deliciously Salty Kick
    Shauna Ahern
    Share on Pinterest
    Since watermelon’s season coincides with heirloom tomatoes’, Shauna Ahern, a.k.a.
    Gluten-Free Girl, combines the two in a salad with feta, tarragon, fruit-olive oil and champagne vinegar. The finished dish is equal parts sweet, salty and creamy.
    Get the recipe: Watermelon-Heirloom Tomato Salad
  • A Red And Green Bowl That’s Really Good For You, Too
    Erin Kunkel
    Share on Pinterest
  • A Lighter Take On A Classic Summer Potluck Dish
    Marina Delio
    Share on Pinterest
    Marina Delio, author of
    The Yummy Mummy Kitchen, figured out how to make a delicious broccoli salad that isn’t loaded with the usual bacon and cheddar. After steaming the florets for two minutes, she combines them with sweet, red grapes and creamy, honey-mustard dressing.
    Get the recipe: Broccoli Antioxidant Salad
  • Fennel and Beets — Without A 350-Degree Oven
    Richard Majchrzak/Studio D
    Share on Pinterest
    We often see beets and fennel roasted, but they’re wonderful raw, too — just shave them thinly with a mandoline or very sharp knife. This salad from homeopathic doctor
    Toni Bark also includes greens, berries, avocado and cucumber, so you get a vibrant mix of sweet, smooth and crunchy.
    Get the recipe: Toni Bark’s Perfect Summer Salad
  • The Tomato Salad That Could Double As Artwork
    Erin Kunkel
    Share on Pinterest
    Even if you use just one or two varieties of heirloom tomatoes — which come in a dazzling array of colors and have names like Big Rainbow, Green Zebra, Chocolate Cherry and Aunt Ruby’s German Green — this salad will look stunning. Serve it with crusty bread to sop up the sweet and tangy juices.
    Get the recipe: Heirloom Tomato Salad with Two Vinegars
  • The Quickest Way To Make A Head Of Romaine Taste Really Special
    William Abranowicz
    Share on Pinterest
    Making an outrageously good salad dressing doesn’t have to be complicated, as Ina Garten shows us in this ultimate back-pocket recipe. Just whisk together champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, minced garlic, salt and pepper — and then slowly add quality olive oil while you continue whisking. It’s a brilliant combination that goes with pretty much any green you have on hand.
    Get the recipe: Green Salad Vinaigrette
    Next: Summer tomatoes, 7 new ways